With a lot of recent research, there’s no denying that taking care of your intestinal microbiome is absolutely essential for digestion, fighting off pathogens, regulating your immune system, improving mood, and overall health. (1).

There are about 39 trillion bacteria in the human microbiome, and they are essential to your health. As stated above, these bacteria accomplish a wide variety of functions for your body, including breaking down food and producing vitamins. (2) Our microbiome, while plentiful, is sensitive and it’s important that you are mindful of what can throw it off balance.

One thing that may damage your microbiome is antibiotics. While antibiotics have their place in medicine, it’s vital that you are aware of the effects that it can have on your gut health. Antibiotics destroy ALL bacteria, good and bad, and they can wipe out colonies of good bacteria in your gut. Because of this, pathogens can take the place of good bacteria and cause inflammation, diarrhea, and other issues. (3) Other factors that affect the gut microbiome are existing medical conditions and physical and emotional stress. (4)

Probiotics

Most of these contributing factors are hard to avoid and all of us experience them at one point or another. This is why it’s important that you ensure you are doing the best that you can to boost your gut health. That’s where probiotics come in! Probiotics are good bacteria that are typically taken orally through supplementation. These good bacteria makes its way down to our intestines and repopulates that environment, often killing pathogens (bad bacteria), thereby boosting the immune system and improving digestion. (5) Probiotics can even counteract the negative side effects of antibiotics and restore good gut health.

Probiotics Are Not Enough

Probiotics are a start in maintaining a healthy microbiome but they aren’t enough. Another essential component to gut health is prebiotics, a type of fiber that the human body can’t digest but feeds the good bacteria in your gut. Prebiotics help create an environment where beneficial bacteria can thrive. They can also improve absorption and can help the body process food quicker. (6) Prebiotics are naturally occuring in food, such as:

  • Chicory
  • Dandelion greens
  • Artichoke
  • Garlic
  • Onions
  • Leeks
  • Asparagus
  • Bananas
  • Flaxseeds
  • And more!

Another factor to improving your gut health are enzymes. These special molecules speed up chemical reactions in the cells, improving metabolism. Enzymes aid in digestion by breaking down large molecules so that they are easier to absorb. For example, enzymes break down starches into sugar that the body then uses for energy. (7)

Your Flora Symbiotics Instead of Probiotics

Your Flora Symbiotics, as opposed to just probiotics, are a fermented, whole food living culture that provides everything needed to support the gut environment including the survival and colonization of the microbes, the diversity of beneficial bacteria, highly bioavailable digestive nutrients, a healthy terrain, and much more that support your flora. They are natural, safe, and as a source of unique nourishment. Symbiotics provide you with probiotics, prebiotics, enzymes, AND nutrients, so that you can optimize your gut bacteria in the best way possible.

Most probiotics are destroyed by your stomach acid, but Your Flora Symbiotics have an 80% survival rate. Your Flora Symbiotics contain diverse strains of microorganisms, are rich in digestive nutrients, and encourage your unique gut flora. They are all USDA Organic, Non-GMO Project certified, vegan, gluten-free, and completely natural.

To learn more about Your Flora Symbiotics and how they can help optimize your health, check out our website. Not sure which Your Flora product would be best for your unique gut microbiome? Take our Your Flora quiz to find out!

References:

1. Harvard Health Publishing. Aug 20, 2019. Should You Take Probiotics? Harvard Health Publishing. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/should-you-take-probiotics Accessed Feb 13, 2019.

2. Jabr, Ferris. July 1, 2017. Do Probiotics Really Work? Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/do-probiotics-really-work/ Accessed Feb 13, 2019.

3. Jabr, Ferris. July 1, 2017. Do Probiotics Really Work? Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/do-probiotics-really-work/ Accessed Feb 13, 2019.

4. Cleveland Clinic. Nov 9, 2018. How to Pick the Best Probiotic for You. Cleveland Clinic. https://health.clevelandclinic.org/how-to-pick-the-best-probiotic-for-you/ Accessed Feb 13, 2019.

5. Harvard Health Publishing. Aug 20, 2019. Should You Take Probiotics? Harvard Health Publishing. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/should-you-take-probiotics Accessed Feb 13, 2019.

6. Villines, Zawn. Oct 29, 2018. What is the Difference Between Prebiotics and Probiotics? Medical News Today. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323490 Accessed Feb 13, 2019.

7. Castro, Joseph. April 26, 2014. How Do Enzymes Work? Live Science. https://www.livescience.com/45145-how-do-enzymes-work.html Accessed Feb 13, 2019.